Association for Conservation of International Endangered Animals

To conserve biodiversity

ACEA has been engaged in conservation activities of endangered animals

ACEA has been engaged in conservation activities of endangered animals

Many wildlife species are now on the brink of extinction.
According to the “Red List” published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), approximately 20% of all mammals and some 30% of all amphibian species have already been designated as endangered species and a significant number of animals and plants, which is estimated approximately 40,000 species, become extinct every year.
Furthermore, biologists warn that we are entering the era of mass extinction where half of all species will go extinct in the next 100 years.

Losing a number of species becomes a very big threat to human beings.
We human beings are a part of this giant ecosystem, the earth, and our everyday life is supported by blessings of nature, which is brought by various species of lives.
Once this “biodiversity” is lost by extinction of species, the balance of ecosystem is also lost, which makes an immeasurable impact on the natural environment.
For example, we may lose clear water, air, rich soil for growing crops and other natural blessings which we take for granted.
Human beings cannot survive in the environment where other species cannot stay alive.

Association for Conservation of International Endangered Animals (ACEA) supports conservation activities of endangered animals in the Asian and Oceanian regions, while raising public awareness of the crisis we are facing.
Just as the Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant incident of March 11, 2011 triggered a dramatic shift toward renewable energy, we are raising public awareness of how serious the situation is and expanding our activity to conserve "biodiversity".
To protect the rich environment where a variety of living creatures live, we are hoping that our activities through ACEA will contribute to this goal.

The current projects

Slow loris conservation is now in progress!

Slow loris conservation is now in progress!

Among the list of international endangered species, we individually select animal species, which are relevant to Japan, and conserve them in a project form.
Currently, we are carrying out a conservation project for slow loris (SL project), the animal being endlessly smuggled to Japan regardless of the ban under the Washington Convention.
In Japan, we are raising public awareness of the fact that slow loris is listed as an endangered species, while providing information of rearing method and studying about breeding. In Southeast Asia where slow lorises live, we have created a collaborative relationship with the local conservation groups to conserve the species.
Also, ACEA is planning to conserve other endangered animals in the future.

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